EARTH MINERAL COSMETICS - MINERAL COSMETICS


Earth mineral cosmetics - Permanent makeup eyebrows before and after - Airbrush makeup for weddings



Earth Mineral Cosmetics





earth mineral cosmetics






    cosmetics
  • Cosmetics are substances used to enhance the appearance or odor of the human body. Cosmetics include skin-care creams, lotions, powders, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail and toe nail polish, eye and facial makeup, permanent waves, colored contact lenses, hair colors, hair sprays and gels,

  • A product applied to the body, esp. the face, to improve its appearance

  • (cosmetic) a toiletry designed to beautify the body

  • (cosmetic) serving an esthetic rather than a useful purpose; "cosmetic fenders on cars"; "the buildings were utilitarian rather than decorative"





    mineral
  • Of or denoting a mineral

  • relating to minerals; "mineral elements"; "mineral deposits"

  • composed of matter other than plant or animal; "the inorganic mineral world"

  • solid homogeneous inorganic substances occurring in nature having a definite chemical composition





    earth
  • Drive (a fox) to its underground lair

  • hide in the earth like a hunted animal

  • the 3rd planet from the sun; the planet we live on; "the Earth moves around the sun"; "he sailed around the world"

  • Cover the root and lower stem of a plant with heaped-up earth

  • (of a fox) Run to its underground lair

  • connect to the earth; "earth the circuit"











earth mineral cosmetics - Earth Therapeutics




Earth Therapeutics Hydrogel Under-Eye Recovery Patch 5ea


Earth Therapeutics Hydrogel Under-Eye Recovery Patch 5ea



The revolutionary, one-step disposable eye treatment from Earth Therapeutics RX. These unique treatment strips adhere to the face to soothe and rejuvenate delicate skin under the eyes. Enriched with a beneficial blend of plant extracts, green tea and anti-oxidant vitamins, the gel sheet is actually an Active Hydrogel Matrix that cools and comforts on contact- while delivering a continuous, concentrated flow of nourishment and hydration to the skin. Puffiness and swelling are relieved; dark circles are diminished. Used regularly over time, the Under-Eye Patches may even help to visibly reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. Each pack contains 5 pairs of patches (total of 10 patches).










76% (6)





Pumpkin-shaped cinnabar container decorated with basket weave and leaves




Pumpkin-shaped cinnabar container decorated with basket weave and leaves





Collections and personal treasures remind us of travels and past pleasures.

Chinese Cinnabar, layer upon layer of lacquer. Then intricate floral and basket texture are carved in. Cinnabar speaks to me, even writing about it brings me to tears. A pumpkin perhaps.

Although lacquer is used in many Asian cultures, the art of carving lacquer is unique to China. Lacquer is the resin (or sap) of a family of trees (rhus verniciflua) found throughout southern China. It is an amazing material that hardens when exposed to oxygen and becomes a natural plastic that is resistant to water and can withstand heat and certain acids.

Known in China during the late Neolithic period (ca. 5000–ca. 2000 B.C.), lacquer was an important artistic medium from the sixth century B.C. to the second century A.D. and was often colored with minerals such as carbon (black), orpiment (yellow), and cinnabar (red) and used to paint the surfaces of sculptures and vessels. There is little evidence for the use of lacquer in China from the second to the eighth century: eighth- to tenth-century examples are often beautifully constructed but with simple shapes and little or no decoration. In the twelfth century, however, a new class of luxury lacquer objects—carved lacquer—appeared. Carved lacquer, which is predominantly red, is often known as “cinnabar” lacquer, a reference to the use of this powdered mercury sulphide as the primary colorant.

Like all lacquer objects, carved pieces have a base that is usually made of turned wood: it is the lacquer that is worked and not the underlying material. In the carved-lacquer technique, multiple layers (often thirty or thirty-five, but at times up to two hundred) are applied onto a substructure in the shape of a box or dish, exposed to air and dried, and carved to create lush geometric motifs, engaging scenes of figures enjoying nature, and lively birds flitting among flowers. In early examples, layers of yellow and green lacquer are interspersed among the predominant red to give a subtle depth to the overall design that is set against a plain background. The extraordinary narrative scenes found on lacquers of the late fourteenth and fifteenth century, on the other hand, have delicately carved backgrounds in which different geometric designs are used to show earth, water, and sky. In addition, in a related technique, a red lacquer background is carved with thin lines that are filled with gold, gold powder, or lacquer that has been tinted black, green, or yellow.

This exhibition, which celebrates the Museum’s collection and includes significant loans from the Florence and Herbert Irving Collection, showcases approximately fifty examples dating from the thirteenth to the eighteenth century. It includes several recently acquired works as well as small boxes for holding incense or cosmetics and larger containers used for papers, scrolls, or presenting gifts. It also presents an important eighteenth-century screen that has recently been restored and is being displayed for the first time.

See my sets, Living in a Jungle and Personal Treasures.











Body armor and travel treasures




Body armor and travel treasures





I love handcrafted work, whether hammered silver or carefully applied layers of lacquer in Chinese Cinnabar. These are my favorite body armor... the pieces that make me feel powerful!

Although lacquer is used in many Asian cultures, the art of carving lacquer is unique to China. Lacquer is the resin (or sap) of a family of trees (rhus verniciflua) found throughout southern China. It is an amazing material that hardens when exposed to oxygen and becomes a natural plastic that is resistant to water and can withstand heat and certain acids.

Known in China during the late Neolithic period (ca. 5000–ca. 2000 B.C.), lacquer was an important artistic medium from the sixth century B.C. to the second century A.D. and was often colored with minerals such as carbon (black), orpiment (yellow), and cinnabar (red) and used to paint the surfaces of sculptures and vessels. There is little evidence for the use of lacquer in China from the second to the eighth century: eighth- to tenth-century examples are often beautifully constructed but with simple shapes and little or no decoration. In the twelfth century, however, a new class of luxury lacquer objects—carved lacquer—appeared. Carved lacquer, which is predominantly red, is often known as “cinnabar” lacquer, a reference to the use of this powdered mercury sulphide as the primary colorant.

Like all lacquer objects, carved pieces have a base that is usually made of turned wood: it is the lacquer that is worked and not the underlying material. In the carved-lacquer technique, multiple layers (often thirty or thirty-five, but at times up to two hundred) are applied onto a substructure in the shape of a box or dish, exposed to air and dried, and carved to create lush geometric motifs, engaging scenes of figures enjoying nature, and lively birds flitting among flowers. In early examples, layers of yellow and green lacquer are interspersed among the predominant red to give a subtle depth to the overall design that is set against a plain background. The extraordinary narrative scenes found on lacquers of the late fourteenth and fifteenth century, on the other hand, have delicately carved backgrounds in which different geometric designs are used to show earth, water, and sky. In addition, in a related technique, a red lacquer background is carved with thin lines that are filled with gold, gold powder, or lacquer that has been tinted black, green, or yellow.

This exhibition, which celebrates the Museum’s collection and includes significant loans from the Florence and Herbert Irving Collection, showcases approximately fifty examples dating from the thirteenth to the eighteenth century. It includes several recently acquired works as well as small boxes for holding incense or cosmetics and larger containers used for papers, scrolls, or presenting gifts. It also presents an important eighteenth-century screen that has recently been restored and is being displayed for the first time.

See my sets, Living in a Jungle and Personal Treasures.









earth mineral cosmetics








earth mineral cosmetics




The Daily Show with Jon Stewart Presents Earth (The Book): A Visitor's Guide to the Human Race






Where do we come from? Who created us? Why are we here? These questions have puzzled us since the dawn of time, but when it became apparent to Jon Stewart and the writers of The Daily Show that the world was about to end, they embarked on a massive mission to write a book that summed up the human race: What we looked like; what we accomplished; our achievements in society, government, religion, science and culture -- all in a tome of 238 pages with lots of color photos, graphs and charts.

After two weeks of hard work, they had their book. EARTH (The Book) is the definitive guide to our species. With their trademark wit, irreverence, and intelligence, Stewart and his team posthumously answer all of life's most hard-hitting questions, completely unburdened by objectivity, journalistic integrity, or even accuracy.










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